Foreign Office warnings and your travel insurance

Travel insurance could be void in dangerous countries

Travel Insurance News - 28/01/2008

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According to the Association of British Insurers, travelers venturing into areas where the Foreign and Commonwealth Office have warned against non essential travel could be at risk of traveling without the benefit of their travel insurance, even if they have purchased a policy before going abroad.

According to the ABI, travel insurance policies vary widely on their terms and conditions, making travel to dangerous areas a gray area. Anyone traveling to an area which has received a travel warning from the Foreign Office should read their policy carefully to see if they are covered.

In general, however, ABI says that most policies will not cover travel to an area against Government advice. Doing so is often considered not taking reasonable care or is considered recklessly putting yourself at risk. For example, many insurance companies are likely to refuse a claim for medical treatment received during a civil disturbance in an area the Government has warned against. The insurance company is likely to consider claims unrelated to such disturbances, however, such as a lost camera.

In addition, many policies specifically do not cover war and risks associated with war including riots and civil disturbances.

Unfortunately, if you have already booked a ticket to an area which the Government later issues a warning about and you decide to cancel your travel to that area, it is unlikely that you will be covered under your travel insurance policy’s cancellation claim.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office recently issued warnings against non essential travel to many areas inside Kenya and Algeria.

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